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Bibliography from NAREA

In an effort to strengthen access to resources related to the Reggio Emilia educational philosophy, the North American Reggio Emilia Alliance (NAREA) features this listing of articles recommended by Lella Gandini, Reggio Children liaison in the U.S. for dissemination of the Reggio Emilia approach, and available to download. Though every effort is made to list resources that are consistent with the spirit and the philosophy of the Reggio experience, inclusion in this list does not constitute endorsement by NAREA.

Edwards, C.P. (2002). Three approaches from Europe: Waldorf, Montessori and Reggio Emilia. Early Childhood Research and Practice, 4(1). Retrieved from http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v4n1/edwards.html

Emde, R.N. (2001). Foreword. In Gandini, L. & Edwards, C., Bambini: The Italian approach to infant/toddler care. New York: Teachers College Press. Reprinted by permission of the publisher. Copyright © 2000 by Teachers College Press. All rights reserved.

Gambetti, A. (2001). A conversation with a group of teachers. In Project Zero & Reggio Children, Making learning visible: Children as individual and group learners. Reggio Emilia, Italy: Reggio Children. © Reggio Children, The President and Fellows of Harvard College, and the Municipality of Reggio Emilia. Reprinted by permission of Reggio Children. Available from Learning Materials Workshop.

Gandini, L. Introduction to the Fundamental Values of the Education of Young Children in Reggio Emilia (adapted from Gandini, L. (2008). Introduction to the schools of Reggio Emilia). In L. Gandini, S. Etheredge, S. & L. Hill (Eds.), Insights and inspirations: Stories of teachers and children from North America (pp. 24-27). Worchester, MA: Davis Publications, Inc.

Gandini, L. Introducción a los Valores Fundamentales de la Educación Infantil en Reggio Emilia (adapted from Gandini, L. (2008). Introduction to the schools of Reggio Emilia. In L. Gandini, S. Etheredge, S. & L. Hill (Eds.), Insights and inspirations: Stories of teachers and children from North America (pp. 24-27). Worchester, MA: Davis Publications, Inc. (Traducido al español por Norma Guinto)

Gandini, L. & Kaminsky, J.A. (2004). Reflections on the relationship between documentation and assessment in the American context: An interview with Brenda Fyfe. Innovations in Early Education: The International Reggio Exchange, 11(1), 5-17.

Haigh, K. (2009). Reinterpreting the Reggio Emilia approach in the USA: An approach for all children. Collage E-Newsletter, Community Playthings. Retrieved from http://www.communityplaythings.com/resources/articles/Reggio/Reinterpreting.html?source=collage

Kaminsky, J.A. & Gandini, L. (2004). Reflections from an American context on “The path toward knowledge”: An interview with Lynn White. Innovations in Early Education: The International Reggio Exchange, 11(3), 7-14.

Katz, L. (1996). The contribution of documentation to the quality of early childhood education. ERIC Digest, ED393608. Retrieved from http://www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/detail?accno=ED393608.

Kennedy, D.K. (1996). After Reggio Emilia: May the conversation begin! Young Children, 51(5). (Posted with permission from the National Association for the Education of Young Children/NAEYC. Copyright © 1996 NAEYC.)

Lally, J.R. 2003. Infant-toddler care in the United States: Where has it been? where is it now? where is it going? Zero to Three, 24(1), 29-34.

Malaguzzi, L. (1994). Your image of the child: Where teaching begins. Child Care Information Exchange, 96. (Reprint permission granted by Exchange Press, www.chlidcareexchange.com)

Malaguzzi, L. (1994). For an education based on relationships. Young Children, 49(1). (Posted with permission from the National Association for the Education of Young Children/NAEYC. Copyright © 1993 NAEYC.)

New, R. (2007). Reggio Emilia as Cultural Activity. Theory Into Practice: Reggio Emilia, 46(1). (Reprint permission granted by Theory Into Practice, http://ehe.osu.edu/tip/)

Oken-Wright, P. (2001). Documentation: Both mirror and light. Innovations in Early Education: The International Reggio Exchange, 8(4), 5-15.

Pelo, A. (2006). At the crossroads: Pedagogical documentation and social justice. In A. Fleet, C. Patterson & J. Robertson (Eds.), Insights: Beyond early childhood pedagogical documentation (pp. 173-190). Castle Hill, NSW, Australia: Padmelon Press. (Reprint permission granted by Padmelon Press, www.padmelonpress.com.au)

Rinaldi, C. (2003). The teacher as researcher. Innovations in Early Education: The International Reggio Exchange, 10(2), 1-4. Available for purchase here.

Rinaldi, C. (2004). The relationship between documentation and assessment. Innovations in Early Education: The International Reggio Exchange, 11(1), 1-4. Available for purchase here.

Seidel, S. (2008). Foreword: Lessons from Reggio. In L. Gandini, S. Etheredge & L. Hill (Eds.), Insights and inspirations from Reggio (pp. 14-15). Worcester, MA: Davis Publications. (Reprint permission granted by Davis Publications, Inc.)

Spaggiari, S. (2004). The path toward knowledge: The social, political and cultural context of the Reggio experience. Innovations in Early Education: The International Reggio Exchange, 11(2), 1-5. Available for purchase here.

Thompson, N. (2006). She is our little sister: Reflections about inclusion. Innovations in Early Education: The International Reggio Exchange, 13(1) 12-20.

In an effort to strengthen access to resources related to the Reggio Emilia educational philosophy, the North American Reggio Emilia Alliance (NAREA) features this listing of articles and book chapters on the NAREA website. Though every effort is made to list resources that are consistent with the spirit and the philosophy of the Reggio experience, inclusion in this list does not constitute endorsement by NAREA.

Bartlett, S. Amiable space in the schools of Reggio Emilia: An interview with Lella Gandini. Children’s Environments, 10 (2).

Berdoussis, N.L., Wong, A. and Wien, C. 2005. Learner as protagonist in a standardized curriculum: A grade three unit on the city. Canadian Children, 30 (2).

Billheimer, W. and Lewis, G. 2004. Transforming environments through self-reflection. Child Care Information Exchange, 157.

Bredekamp, S. 2004. The world comes to Reggio Emilia. Young Children, 59 (5).

Bredekamp, S. 1993. Reflections on Reggio Emilia. Young Children, 49 (1).

Breig-Allen C., Hill, J., Geismar-Ryan, L. and Cadwell, L.B. 1998. The language of lines. Young Children, 53 (4).

Cecil, J., Cothran, K. and White, L. 2002. Changes in the environment through collaboration. Child Care Information Exchange, 147.

Devji, Saira. 2005. Constructing our learning community: Reflections on a summer institute with Gunilla Dahlberg. Canadian Children, 30 (2).

Drew, W.F. and Rankin, B. 2004. Promoting creativity for life using open-ended materials. Young Children, 59 (4).

Edwards, C.P. and Raikes, H. 2002. Extending the dance: Relationship-based approaches to infant-toddler care and education. Young Children, 57 (4).

Edwards, C. and Springate, K. 1995. The lion comes out of the stone: Helping young children achieve their creative potential. Southern Early Childhood Association Dimensions of Early Childhood, 23 (4).

Edwards, C. and Springate, K. 1993. Inviting children into project work. Southern Early Childhood Association Dimensions of Early Childhood, 22 (1).

Felstiner, S. 2004. Emergent environments: Involving children in classroom design. Child Care Information Exchange, 157.

Fyfe, B. 1998. Questions for collaboration: Lessons from Reggio Emilia. Canadian Children, 23 (1).

Gandini, L. 2005. Recycled materials. Child Care Information Exchange, 161.

Gandini, L. with Gambetti, A. 1997. An inclusive system based on cooperation: The schools for young children in Reggio Emilia, Italy. New Directions for School Leadership, 3.

Gandini, L. 1996. Teachers and children together: Constructing new learning. Child Care Information Exchange, 108.

Gandini, L. 1994. Celebrating children day by day in Reggio Emilia, a conversation with Amelia Gambetti. Child Care Information Exchange, 100.

Gandini, L. 1994. Not just anywhere: making child care centers into “particular” places. Child Care Information Exchange, 96.

Gandini, L. 1994. What can we learn from Reggio Emilia: An Italian-American collaboration, an interview with Amelia Gambetti and Mary Beth Radke. Child Care Information Exchange, 96.

Gandini, L. 1993. Fundamentals of the Reggio Emilia approach to early childhood education. Young Children, 49 (1).

Gambetti, A. 2002. Safety issues. Child Care Information Exchange, 147.

Gambetti, A. 2001. Making choices for learning through relationships and interactions. Child Care Information Exchange, 141.

Gestwicki, C. 1999. A look at developmentally appropriate programs: The schools of Reggio Emilia. Developmentally Appropriate Practice: Curriculum and Development in Early Education. Second Edition. Albany, N. Y.: Delmar.

Goldhaber, J. 1998. Oh, Miss Jones! Where did you get that beautiful butterfly? Young Children, 53 (4).

Gray, H. 2001. Initiation into documentation: A fishing trip with toddlers. Young Children, 56(6).

Haigh, K., Rodriquez, D. and Schroeder, G. 2002. A study of hands: Chicago Commons explores Reggio Emilia. Child Care Information Exchange, 144.

Hall, E., Oleson, V. and Gambetti, A. 2001. Including parents in the process of documentation. Child Care Information Exchange, 138.

Hinkle, Pia. 1991, Dec. 2. The Best Schools in the World: A School Must Rest on the Idea That All Children Are Different. Newsweek.

Hughes, E. and Hess, A. 2003. Using Observation: A Mini-Experience in the Life of Children and Teachers. Child Care Information Exchange, 152.

Katz, L. 1990. Impressions of Reggio Emilia preschools. Young Children, 45 (6).

Kennedy, D.K. 1996. After Reggio Emilia: May the conversation begin! Young Children, 51 (5).

Kocher, L. 2004. Disposition to document: Portraits of practice. Canadian Children, 29 (1).

Lane, M. S. 1993. Loris Malaguzzi’s one hundred languages. Scholastic Early Childhood Today, 8 (2).

Leura, G.R. and Hong, S.B. 2003. A collaborative long-term garden project: Integrating early childhood education, environmental education and landscape architecture. Canadian Children, 28 (1).

Malaguzzi, L. 1994. Your image of the child: Where teaching begins. Child Care Information Exchange, 96.

Malaguzzi, L., 1994. Listening to children. Tribute to Loris Malaguzzi. Young Children, 49 (5).

Malaguzzi, L. 1993. For an education based on relationships. Young Children, 49 (1).

Meet Karen Haigh, director, Chicago Commons, Chicago, Illinois. 2001. Child Care Information Exchange, 142.

Moran, M. J. and Jarvis, J. 2001. Helping young children develop higher order thinking. Young Children, 56 (5).

Neugebauer, B. 2004. Crossing boundaries: Ideas and experiences in dialogue for a new culture of education of children and adults – A conversation with Amelia Gambetti. Child Care Information Exchange, 157.

Neugebauer, B. 1994. Unpacking my questions and images: Personal reflections on Reggio Emilia. Child Care Information Exchange, 96.

New, R. 2003. Reggio Emilia: New Ways to Think About Schooling. Educational Leadership, April 2003, 60 (7).

New, R. 1997. Reggio Emilia’s commitment to children and community: A reconceptualization of quality and DAP. Canadian Children, 22 (1).

New, R. 1990. Excellent early education: A city in Italy has it! Young Children, 45 (6).

Pelo, A. 2002. From borders to bridges: Transforming our relationships with parents. Child Care Information Exchange, 147.

Rinaldi, C. 2002. Research and learning. Child Care Information Exchange, 145.

Stremmel, A.J. 2002. Teacher research: Nurturing professional and personal growth through inquiry. Young Children. 57 (5).

Tarr, P. 2005. Drawing at the centre. Canadian Children, 30 (1).

Tarr, P. 2004. Consider the walls. Young Children, 59 (3).

United States General Accounting Office. 1995 Program in Reggio Emilia Considered Among Best. Early Childhood Programs: Promoting the Development of Young Children in Denmark, France and Italy. Washington, DC: United States General Accounting Office.

Wien, C.A., Coates, A., Keating, B. & Bigelow, B.C. 2005. Designing the environment to build connection to place. Young Children, 60 (3).

Wien, C.A. 2005. Six short reasons why pedagogy matters in schools. Canadian Children, 30 (1).

Wien, C.A. 2003. Scene for a reflection: Neruda school, Reggio Emilia Feb. 14, 2002. Canadian Children, 28 (1).

Youngblood, J.G. 2008. Preschool curriculum forges a connection between protagonists. Child Care Information Exchange, 183.

In an effort to strengthen access to resources related to the Reggio Emilia educational philosophy, the North American Reggio Emilia Alliance (NAREA) features this listing of books on the NAREA website. Though every effort is made to list resources that are consistent with the spirit and the philosophy of the Reggio experience, inclusion in this list does not constitute endorsement by NAREA. For a comprehensive bibliography of resources published by Reggio Children, log onto Reggio Children website.

Cadwell, L. 2002. Bringing Learning to Life: The Reggio Approach to Early Childhood Education. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Cadwell, L. 1997. Bringing Reggio Emilia Home: An Innovative Approach to Early Childhood Education. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Dahlberg, G. and Moss, P. 2005. Ethics and Politics in Early Childhood Education. New York, NY: Routledge.

Dahlberg, G., Moss, P. and Pence, A. 1999. Beyond Quality in Early Childhood Education and Care: Postmodern Perspectives. London, UK: Falmer Press.

Edwards, C. and Rinaldi, C., Eds. 2009. The Diary of Laura: Perspectives on a Reggio Emilia Diary. St. Paul, MN: Redleaf Press.

Edwards, C., Gandini, L. and Forman, G., Eds. 1998. The Hundred Languages of Children: The Reggio Emilia Approach-Advanced Reflections (Second Edition). Greenwich, CT: Ablex Publishing Corp.

Edwards, C., Gandini, L. and Forman, G., Eds. 1993. The Hundred Languages of Children: The Reggio Emilia Approach to Early Childhood Education. Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing Corp.

Fraser, S. 2000. Authentic Childhood: Experiencing Reggio Emilia in the Classroom. Scarborough, ON: Nelson Thomas Learning.

Fu, V.; Hill L. and Stremmel, A. 2001. Teaching and Learning, Collaborative Exploration of the Reggio Emilia Approach. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, Inc.

Gandini, L., Etheredge, S. and Hill. L., Eds. 2008. Insights and Inspirations: Stories of Teachers and Children from North America. Worcester, MA: Davis Publications, Inc.

Gandini, L., Hill, L., Cadwell, L. and Schwall, C., Eds. 2005. In the Spirit of the Studio: Learning from the Atelier of Reggio Emilia. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Gandini, L. and Edwards, C.P., Eds. 2001. Bambini: The Italian Approach to Infant/Toddler Care. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Hendrick, J. Ed. 2003. Next Steps in Teaching the Reggio Way: Accepting the Challenge to Change-Second Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall.

Hendrick, J., Ed. 1997. First Steps Toward Teaching the Reggio Way. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, Inc.

Hill, L., Stremmel, A and Fu, V. 2005. Teaching as inquiry: Rethinking curriculum in early childhood education. Columbus, OH: Allyn and Bacon.

Milliken, J. 2003. Reflections: Reggio Emilia Principles Within Australian Contexts. Castle Hill, NSW Australia: Pademelon Press.

Rinaldi, C. 2006. In Dialogue with Reggio Emilia: Listening, Researching and Learning. New York, NY: Routledge.

Scheinfeld, D.R., Haigh, K.M. & Scheinfeld, J.P. 2008. We are All Explorers: Learning and Teaching with Reggio Principles in Urban Settings. New York NY: Teachers College Press.

Smith, D. and Goldhaber, J. 2004. Poking, Pinching and Pretending: Documenting Toddlers’ Explorations with Clay. St. Paul, MN: Redleaf Press.

Wien, C.A. 2008. Emergent Curriculum in the Primary Classroom. New York NY: Teachers College Press.

In an effort to strengthen access to resources related to the Reggio Emilia educational philosophy, the North American Reggio Emilia Alliance (NAREA) features this listing of audio-visual materials on the NAREA website. Though every effort is made to list resources that are consistent with the spirit and the philosophy of the Reggio experience, inclusion in this list does not constitute endorsement by NAREA. For comprehensive listing of audio-video resources produced by Reggio Children, log onto Reggio Children website.

Message From Malaguzzi. 1993. A one-hour video of an interview with Loris Malaguzzi. Produced by George Forman and Lella Gandini.

Bambini: Early Care and Education in Pistoia, Italy, a Child-Friendly City. 2003. Produced by C. Edwards, L. Gandini, L. Peon-Casanova and J. Danielson. This is a companion video to Bambini: The Italian Approach to Infant-Toddler Care.

Detroit Head Start Inspired by the Reggio Approach. 1996. A video about a Reggio-inspired professional development project with Detroit Head Start teachers in collaboration with the Merrill-Palmer Institute, Wayne State University. Available from Wayne State University College of Education, 313 577 4380, email: [email:j_a_kaminsky@wayne.edu:Judith Allen Kaminsky]

Early Learning in Reggio Emilia, Italy. 1993. A clear overview of the early education programs in Reggio, presented with slides by Dr. Brenda Fyfe. Available from Document and Publication Services, Western Illinois University, 309 298-1917, email: [email:DJ-Burnell@wiu.edu:DJ Burnell]

100 Languages of Children. 1995. A 30-minute video filmed at The Hundred Languages of Children exhibit in 1993-1994 at Dominican College, San Rafael, California, in order to create a memory of the exhibit. Produced by Susan Lyon. Available from Susan Lyon, 415 297 8211, email: [email:slyon@mills.edu:Susan Lyon]

Side by Side: Mentoring Teachers for Reflective Practice. 2004. A 25-minute video that follows two child care programs as they design a mentoring program to guide their teachers in becoming better observers and curriculum developers, drawing on the children’s interests and ideas. Produced by Harvest Resources, website: www.ecetrainers.com

The Amusement Park for Birds. 1994. A 90-minute video that follows the evolution of a long-term project at La Villetta School of Reggio Emilia, Italy. Produced by George Forman and Lella Gandini.

The Long Jump: A Video Analysis of Small Group Projects in Early Education as Practiced in Reggio Emilia, Italy. 1991. Produced by George Forman and Lella Gandini.

To See Takes Time: Growing Curriculum from Children’s Theories. 2004. A 25-minute video on how curriculum can become meaningful for children and adults when teachers follow the children’s interests and guide them through in-depth project work. Produced by Harvest Resources, website: www.ecetrainers.com.